How Well Do You Know Criminal Law?How Well Do You Know Criminal Law?


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How Well Do You Know Criminal Law?

Sure, you know what's illegal and what's not. You know how to avoid breaking the law. But do you know the technicalities that can get your case dismissed in court? Do you know what kind of evidence is allowed in your defense and what isn't? Do you know how to effectively cross-examine a witness? If the answer to these questions is no, then you shouldn't be considering defending yourself in court. When a criminal case gets to court, innocence doesn't matter as much as experience with criminal law does. You need an experienced lawyer to help you defend yourself. In this blog, I'll share experiences that can help you understand what is going to happen in court and how to assist in your own defense. But the most important piece of advice I can give you is this: don't go to court without a lawyer.

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Medical Expenses Too High? Make Sure to Contact a Foreclosure Attorney If Necessary

Losing a limb to diabetes may take a person years to overcome but, during that time, they typically still have bills to pay. Unfortunately, this situation could cause a person to lose their home because they don't properly pay their mortgage. Thankfully, defenses against this act are possible. 

Medical Expenses Can Make Mortgage Payments Tough

People with severe diabetes may find themselves struggling to stay healthy and may find that amputation of a limb is a necessity. This scary situation often gets many people with diabetes to start taking better care of their bodies. Unfortunately, people in this situation may find work impossible or struggle to focus on important day-to-day tasks.

In this scenario, many people may even forget or be unable to pay their mortgage for an extended period and find themselves staring at a foreclosure letter. With nowhere to go and the danger of homelessness staring them in the face, these individuals need to build up their courage and create a defense against a potentially disastrous foreclosure.

Defenses are Possible for Foreclosure

People who lost a limb and lost their home in a foreclosure have many defenses to consider. For example, they can claim that they never received a letter stating that they were in violation of their mortgage terms. These types of defenses may prove tricky to stage, however, as the lender may simply point to a duplicate of the letter mailed to the person making the claim.

Other defenses include the fact that the foreclosing party cannot prove that they own the loan due to gaps in paperwork. Again, this type of defense is possible but is not likely to succeed. Instead, somebody who lost a limb due to diabetes or other complications should seriously consider writing a hardship letter instead.

A hardship letter is a statement that an individual suffered from an unforeseen disaster that made paying their mortgage impossible. Losing a limb to diabetes definitely falls under this heading because a lengthy recovery period and, potentially, an inability to work would make paying mortgages very difficult. In this situation, an individual may be able to work out a repayment plan with their mortgage agent.

However, anybody in this position needs to contact a foreclosure defense attorney to get the help that they need. These experts can help them write their hardship letter in a way that improves their chances of success. While this approach doesn't always work, it is often the best way to save a house.